PUNCTUATION USED TO SHOW EMPHASIS — A BREAK IN THOUGHT — AND A BLOG BY EMILY HAGEDORN

Archive for August, 2011|Monthly archive page

Ira Glass shows tough love along with other lessons from NPR

In Fresh Air, Ira Glass, journalism, literature, National Public Radio, radio, Radiolab, reporting, storytelling, This American Life, Tom Wolfe, YouTube on August 24, 2011 at 9:00 am

I recently came across reporting advice in three of National Public Radio’s most popular shows.

Some of these episodes and clips may not be the most recent; I came across them serendipitously.

But they are definitely gems.

The first was This American Life‘s “Make Radio” page, which includes links to tips on reporting from some of the shows’ best contributors.

It also leads readers to Transom.org, which is “a showcase and workshop for new public radio.”

Unfortunately, some of the links on TAL’s page don’t work anymore, including videos of the man himself, Ira Glass, passing down his wisdom. Read the rest of this entry »

Bluegrass bubbly, laser beams and beer

In commentary, entertainment, Kentucky, Louisville, music, my life, photography, travel on August 23, 2011 at 9:00 am

I have a new drink, and it’s all Kentucky.

I tried a sip of “Kentucky champagne” on Friday at Harvest restaurant on Market Street near downtown Louisville. It’s made with Old Forester, Licor 43, Ale-8-One and lemon peel.

The Ale-8-One sweetens the bourbon, taking away any bite.

Considering Harvest is about bringing the local into the kitchen — or the bar, in this instance — this drink fits right in. Nothing gets more Kentucky than Ale 8 and bourbon.

And I’m encouraged by the fact that all of the food served is sustainably raised and in-season. It makes for an interesting, ever-changing menu. Read the rest of this entry »

Google Voice helps me look like a local

In apps, blogs, Google Voice, journalism, reporting, social media, technology on August 19, 2011 at 9:00 am

Google Voice is my new, impressive, close acquaintance who is on the way to becoming a great friend.

I signed up for Google Voice last week, and really started exploring it today. And so far, I like.

(I know I’m probably a little late to the game on this, but I figure that since I didn’t understand all the ins and outs of this until now, there are probably others who still don’t as well.)

Google Voice is free for the most part and allows you to forward calls to any number of phones using a number provided by Google.

I was initially intrigued for these reasons:

  • My cell phone number is long distance from where I now live. Having a local number makes it easier for sources with land lines to call me, reiterates that I’m local and beats carrying around two phones or changing the number I’ve had for close to 10 years. Read the rest of this entry »

‘Howl’ roars for free speech

In commentary, entertainment, film, free speech, freedom of speech, history, journalism, literature, music, poetry, storytelling, YouTube on August 15, 2011 at 9:00 am

I love it when a movie pulls you in and won’t let you go.

I had that with “Howl” last night.

The movie came out last year and is a pseudo-documentary about beat poet Allen Ginsberg and the obscenity trial that followed the publishing of his famous poem, “Howl.”

Like the poem, parts of the movie are graphic — I’ll warn you. But much like what the poem’s supporters argued during the fracas that ensued following the poem’s publication, the “obscene” words and images in the movie are not used to be lewd and sensational but to describe how Ginsberg saw the 1950s society he was a part of. Read the rest of this entry »

Meeting readers outside the newsroom — a novel idea

In blogs, branding, Facebook, Google+, journalism, reporting, social media, technology, Twitter on August 12, 2011 at 9:00 am

I suppose it’s a little insulting that this strikes me and others, including the Nieman Journalism Lab, as innovative.

Going to where the readers are, making yourself available for coffee — groundbreaking to be sure.

But, really, I’m quite taken with this.

Earlier this week, California Watch, an initiative of the nonpartisan Center for Investigative Reporting, had its reporters spread out around the state — and even beyond — and set up shop in wifi-enabled coffeehouses.

They call it Open Newsroom, and this most recent one was its fourth to date. The idea is that reporters mingle with readers, gathering story ideas while promoting California Watch at the same time. Read the rest of this entry »

Great poster for a newsroom

In decor, journalism on August 5, 2011 at 5:52 pm


I want this above my desk at work.

During those bad days when the deadlines are coming at you faster than the work is getting done, when the only people calling are your editors wanting the story, when you’ve already worked eight hours and are surely going to be working several hours more — and then a train derails or your county council announces it lost all its money to an Internet scam or several prisoners just walked away from the jail — this kind of sums it up.

Yep, I need this.

My Morning Jacket gets exposure — by not getting exposure

In branding, commentary, entertainment, Facebook, Google+, journalism, Kentucky, Louisville, music, social media, YouTube on August 4, 2011 at 9:00 am

Since Tuesday I’ve been reading about how My Morning Jacket became one of the first bands to debut a music video on Google+.

The video, which is for “Holdin On To Black Metal,” actually went up Monday, a day before the official release. Since groups, including bands, can’t get pages on Google+ yet, two of the band members, Tom Blankenship and Carl Broemel, posted it on their personal pages.

(Band frontman Jim James doesn’t seem to have a page yet, though a Yim Yames, the pseudonym he used for his solo work, has a bare yet strange profile.)

And the reaction has included fans and others questioning the band’s decision to use Google+, Google’s fledgling social network, for the premiere. Read the rest of this entry »

3 markets, 2 cities, 1 weekend

In Cincinnati, Kentucky, Lexington, my life, photography, shopping, travel on August 3, 2011 at 9:00 am

I didn’t set out to make last weekend an interstate tour of markets, but bags full of produce, cheese and meat and a slightly lighter wallet later, I suppose that’s what it became.

First up was the Lexington Farmers Market, which I’ve fallen in love with since living here. The vendors pack in the pavilion space, and the variety of goods is enviable.

Tomatoes? Check.

Sadistic Mistress hot sauces? Check.

Flowers? Check.

Smoothies you blend via stationary bike? Check.

Plus the people are kind of kooky, a definite plus. Read the rest of this entry »

The local Twitterrati offer tips to gain influence

In branding, journalism, Kentucky, Lexington, reporting, social media, technology, Twitter on August 2, 2011 at 7:57 pm

I spent the last week learning about the people behind the tweets I see pop up on my local Twitter feed.

I had set out to find the biggest tweeters in Lexington, Ky., and with the help of Twitter Grader, I found out that a local social media consultant outranks the much beloved and worshipped University of Kentucky men’s basketball coach, or rather the Twitter profile that bears his name — someone else actually tweets for him.

A self-proclaimed iPhone hacker came in at No. 3, and in fourth place was a local sports commentator who is equally loved by Wildcat fans as he is hated by fans of all other schools in Kentucky.

And along with coming away with a great story, I’ve learned more about Twitter, how to write about it and how to be better at it.  Read the rest of this entry »

Must-read stories for any journalist … and American

In Afghanistan, commentary, family, journalism, Kentucky, narrative, photography, storytelling, war on August 1, 2011 at 5:44 pm

I just finished part two of The Virginian-Pilot’s five-day series on the NATO hospital at Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan.

Wow. Just … wow.

I rarely cry when I read news stories or even fiction, and this has me tearing up. Writer Corinne Reilly brings the reader into the hospital — which gets some of the worst casualties in Afghanistan — into some of the most heart-wrenching moments a human can endure.

And then the photos, by Ross Taylor, really bring it all to life.

Both aspects are beyond superb and show the power and importance that journalism when done well can have.

Here’s how Reilly begins part one: Read the rest of this entry »