PUNCTUATION USED TO SHOW EMPHASIS — A BREAK IN THOUGHT — AND A BLOG BY EMILY HAGEDORN

Archive for the ‘literature’ Category

30 before 30

In 30 before 30, blogs, coding, commentary, decor, entertainment, family, food, hobbies, journalism, literature, Louisville, music, my life, programming, travel on February 23, 2012 at 9:30 am

A lot of things recently have made me reevaluate the person I am and where I’m at in my life — not the least of which is the fact that I’m turning 30 in October.

On one hand, I feel like I can still get into the head of the person I was at 22, when I was living in Bakersfield. But then again, I go over all the things that have happened since then and know that I must have changed.

And lately, I feel like I’ve slacked off on many of my hobbies and taking journeys, which is what made the decade following high school so much fun.

So this has been running through my head, and then I saw friend Maggie Creamer’s blog “Sometimes you need that.” Read the rest of this entry »

Ira Glass shows tough love along with other lessons from NPR

In Fresh Air, Ira Glass, journalism, literature, National Public Radio, radio, Radiolab, reporting, storytelling, This American Life, Tom Wolfe, YouTube on August 24, 2011 at 9:00 am

I recently came across reporting advice in three of National Public Radio’s most popular shows.

Some of these episodes and clips may not be the most recent; I came across them serendipitously.

But they are definitely gems.

The first was This American Life‘s “Make Radio” page, which includes links to tips on reporting from some of the shows’ best contributors.

It also leads readers to Transom.org, which is “a showcase and workshop for new public radio.”

Unfortunately, some of the links on TAL’s page don’t work anymore, including videos of the man himself, Ira Glass, passing down his wisdom. Read the rest of this entry »

‘Howl’ roars for free speech

In commentary, entertainment, film, free speech, freedom of speech, history, journalism, literature, music, poetry, storytelling, YouTube on August 15, 2011 at 9:00 am

I love it when a movie pulls you in and won’t let you go.

I had that with “Howl” last night.

The movie came out last year and is a pseudo-documentary about beat poet Allen Ginsberg and the obscenity trial that followed the publishing of his famous poem, “Howl.”

Like the poem, parts of the movie are graphic — I’ll warn you. But much like what the poem’s supporters argued during the fracas that ensued following the poem’s publication, the “obscene” words and images in the movie are not used to be lewd and sensational but to describe how Ginsberg saw the 1950s society he was a part of. Read the rest of this entry »